Form Follows Environment: Nordic architects vs Climate Change

Powerhouse Brattørkaia by Snøhetta - Photo © Ivar Kvaal

Nordic architects are showing the way to build a sustainable future. BIG completes the cleanest waste-to-energy plant topped with a ski slope, Snøhetta has inaugurated the the world’s northernmost energy-positive building. Dorte Mandrup’s Icefjord Centre breaks ground to offer breathtaking views of a melting UNESCO World Heritage Site, new sustainable cultural venues thrive in Helsinki and a sinking arctic Swedish city is being relocated…

Irreplaceable Landscapes: at Dorte Mandrup showcases sustainable architectures in endangered UNESCO sites

IRREPLACEABLE LANDSCAPES exhibition @ DAC. Photo by R. Hjortshoj - courtesy of the Danish Architecture Center.

How does the landscapes shape the architecture? The Irreplaceable Landscapes exhibition at Copenhagen DAC Museum narrates four of Dorte Mandrup’s most audacious projects dealing with natural environments threatened by Climate Change.

Snøhetta’s S-1500 chair is made from recycled plastic waste from the Arctic fishing industry

S-1500 up-cycled chair by Snøhetta and Nordic Comfort Products - Photo: ©Bjørnar Øvrebø, courtesy of Snøhetta.

The S-1500 chair is made from fishnets and ropes contributing to building a local circular economy. The material is processed to create a marble-like matte, pebbled, dark green surface which is unique and mass produced at the same time.

The Icefjord Centre: Dorte Mandrup takes Venice Biennale to an Arctic extreme with a sensuous installation

Icefjord Centre by Dorte Mandrup in Venice - Photo by Andrea Avezzù, courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia.

Dorte Mandrup’s partially submerged Icefjord Centre in Greenland offers a breathtaking view on one of the most active glaciers on the planet. The project is on show at Venice Biennale with an exhibition which recreates the sounds and the colours of Arctic wilderness.

Iceland: extremely Nordic design goes on show at the Aurora exhibition

Icelandic Design

Aurora exhibition at Stockholm Furniture Fair offers the chance to dig into the unique features of each Nordic country. We picked Iceland. Here extreme conditions became the cradle for a distinct creative approach: sulphure designs, flat-packed paper lamps and even furniture made of whale bones and shark teeth.