Chile Pavilion "Monolith Controversies" - Photo by Gonzalo Puga.

Chile Pavilion “Monolith Controversies” – Photo by Gonzalo Puga.

Curated by Pedro Alonso and Hugo Palmarola, Chile’s silver-Lion winning Pavilon  welcomes visitors in Ms. Gutierrez’s living room: here, pink walls and vintage furniture, ceramic elephants and familiy pictures are just the details of a much bigger picture. Indeed, Ms Gutierrez lives in a prefabricated flat built in the 70s and part of a giant social-housing project that marked Chilean political and architectural history. monolith-controversies.comhttp://labiennale.org

Chile Pavilion "Monolith Controversies" - Photo by Felipe Aravena.

Chile Pavilion “Monolith Controversies” – Photo by Felipe Aravena.

From the living room, guests are led in the real core of the exhibiton where a concrete monolith positioned in the centre of the room stands up as a fundamental symbol of the absorption of modernity as well as the country prefabricated past.

Chile Pavilion "Monolith Controversies" - Photo by Gonzalo Puga.

Chile Pavilion “Monolith Controversies” – Photo by Gonzalo Puga.

The concrete monolith was indeed one of the first ever produced by the Chilean KPD plant—an industry to produce prefabricated housing donated in 1972 by the Soviet Union to the Chilean road to socialism led by president Salvador Allende.

Chile Pavilion "Monolith Controversies" - Photo by Gonzalo Puga.

Chile Pavilion “Monolith Controversies” – Photo by Gonzalo Puga.

This panel has since been the agent of several political and ideological controversies, especially after Allende himself signed it up in the wet concrete, if only for his gesture to be later covered up by Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship, adding the panel the representations of the Virgin and Child between two colonial style lamp fixtures.

Chile Pavilion "Monolith Controversies" - Photo by Gonzalo Puga.

Chile Pavilion “Monolith Controversies” – Photo by Gonzalo Puga.

Curators Pedro Alonso and Hugo Palmarola say: “This piece of concrete represents a relatively marginal tradition in the historiographies of modern architecture despite the fact that more than 170 million large-concrete panel apartments were built worldwide during the second half of the twentieth century. Thus the panel becomes fundamental symbol to the absorption of modernity proposed as the concept for the 2014 Venice International Architecture Exhibition”.

Chile Pavilion "Monolith Controversies" - Photo by Gonzalo Puga.

Chile Pavilion “Monolith Controversies” – Photo by Gonzalo Puga.

Monolith Controversies is a work based in a research project documenting the 153 housing blocks built in Chile by the KPD plant, as well as the technical, typological and conceptual reconstruction of 28 large-concrete panel systems developed and disseminated worldwide between 1931 and 1981.

Chile Pavilion "Monolith Controversies" - Photo by Gonzalo Puga.

Chile Pavilion “Monolith Controversies” – Photo by Gonzalo Puga.

Photos: courtesy of The National Council of Culture and the Arts of Chile. monolith-controversies.com

Chile Pavilion "Monolith Controversies" - panel in factory. © Nolberto Salinas González

Chile Pavilion “Monolith Controversies” – panel in factory. © Nolberto Salinas González

Chile Pavilion "Monolith Controversies" - building assembly. © Nolberto Salinas González

Chile Pavilion “Monolith Controversies” – building assembly. © Nolberto Salinas González