The Fuzzy Logic Project - Photos: courtesy of Marta Santambrogio.

The Fuzzy Logic Project – Photos: courtesy of Marta Santambrogio.

Was if the urban soundscape was an orchestrated moving symphony rather than a random mesh of unintended sound? The Fuzzy Logic project by young designer Marta Santambrogio is a speculative project that responds to noise pollution with music composition.

The Fuzzy Logic Project

Marta Santambrogio plunged into the challenging entropy of Indian streets to turn local tuk-tuks into music-making vehicles able to compose the sound of traffic as a whole.

Traffic noise is now the inorganic combination of individually designed sounds. A recent European law states that new models of electric and hybrid vehicles will have to make a noise by 2019.

The Fuzzy Logic Project

Exploiting the potential of current shifts towards electric transport, the Fuzzy Logic project presents an alternative: noise itself becomes the object of design, and traffic is turned into a musical experience. Future e-cars are approached as speakers on wheels.

The Fuzzy Logic Project

With the help of local drivers and musicians, Marta Santambrogio adapted traditional Indian musical instruments and then integrated them into a system designed to be randomly harmonic.

The Fuzzy Logic Project

The Fuzzy Logic project led to the creation of the Exhaustophone, a speaker for electric tuk-tuks that consists in a 1.5 m long steel horn attached to a tuk-tuk exhaust.

The Fuzzy Logic Project

Marta Santambrogio says: “Indian music and traffic work basically the same. They are both based on improvisation, they have a quite precise set of rules that are intentionally ambiguous to allow interpretation and improvvisation”.

The key  to of the project was not to compose a music piece for traffic. I wanted to design rules for vehicles, in a way which would then make musical sense when traffic moves together randomly.  Just like instruments improvising in a jam session”.

The Fuzzy Logic Project