Installation DesignMiami

DesignMiami/ 2015. A solar globe studded with bespoke crystals, a graded aircraft design and a pink architectural constellation of unbuilt projects… We selected our favourite installations at Miami art and design week.


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UNBUILT Pavilion - Photo by James Harris, courtesy of DesignMiami/.

UNBUILT Pavilion – Photo by James Harris, courtesy of DesignMiami/.

At DesignMiami/ main entrance, students of the Master of Architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design created the UNBUILT pavilion. A white-painted metal grid spearing 200 upside down models that were 3D printed in pink foam. Visitors that pass underneath the pavilion can look up and get further informations on each model woth a mobile app developed by digital design firm Modelo.

131 – YOUSEF HUSSEIN
105 – JOHNSTON MARKLEE
092 – NICOLAS LEE
078 – YU CHEN
066 – JENNIFER BONNER

For the first time, DesignMiami/ collaborated with a school and organized a competition for students of Harvard GSD. The winning concept for the installation was developed by Joanne Cheung, Jenny Shen, Steven Meyer, Doug Harsevoort, and Yiliu Shen-Burke.

UNBUILT Pavilion - Photo by James Harris, courtesy of DesignMiami/.

UNBUILT Pavilion – Photo by James Harris, courtesy of DesignMiami/.

Swarovski presents the installation El Sol by by Mexican architect Fernando Romero: a vast luminous globe designed to scale, one billion times smaller than the sun.

Swarovski: EL SOL Design Miami photo by Robin Hill . Courtesy of Swarovski.

Swarovski: EL SOL Design Miami photo by Robin Hill . Courtesy of Swarovski.

The structure is studded with 2.880 custom-made precision-cut crystals mounted on a spheric setting. Faceted internally, the crystals augment the light emitted from the installation’s core evoking the sun’s gaseous, moving terrain.

Swarovski: EL SOL Design Miami photo by Robin Hill . Courtesy of Swarovski.

Swarovski: EL SOL Design Miami photo by Robin Hill . Courtesy of Swarovski.

El Sol is inspired by the sacred geometry used by the ancient Aztecs and Mayans in constructing their pyramids, which were designed as a means to monitor celestial events. For the El Sol instalation, Swarovski teamed with the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Birmingham, UK, to create a soundscape tracking and amplifying the sun’s acoustinc waves.

Swarovski: EL SOL Design Miami photo by Robin Hill . Courtesy of Swarovski.

Swarovski: EL SOL Design Miami photo by Robin Hill . Courtesy of Swarovski.

 

New York studio Snarkitecture reimagined the exterior of a NetJets Global 5000 aircraft. Inspired by the the gradient colours of the horizon, the installation welcomed passengers at Aviation terminal at Miami International Airport.

Snarrkitecture for NetJets - Courtesy of NetJets.

Snarrkitecture for NetJets – Courtesy of NetJets.

Alex Mustonen and Daniel Arsham of Snarkitecture say: “We were especially interested in exploring the phenomenon of an ombre sky—that moment at dawn or dusk, when the sky creates a perfect gradient transition from light to dark. The effect is especially remarkable when viewed from the window of an airplane and it intimately connects the experience of flying with the surrounding infinite expanse of sky”.

Snarrkitecture for NetJets - Courtesy of NetJets.

Snarrkitecture for NetJets – Courtesy of NetJets.

Swarovski: EL SOL Design Miami photo by Robin Hill . Courtesy of Swarovski.

Swarovski: EL SOL Design Miami photo by Robin Hill . Courtesy of Swarovski.