Channelling Change exhibition - Pictured: Future Remnants - Photo by Xandra van Der Eijk.

Future Remnants – Photo by Xandra van Der Eijk 01

Milan 2020, Sustainable – We have selected 6 out-of-the-box designs on show at Ventura Projects’ digital exhibition Channelling Change: Inside A Designer’s Brain. The showcase was intended to have its premiere at the canceled Milan Design Week, and had to go digital at Dezeen’s Virtual Design Festival, the digital kermesse giving voice to international exhibitions and product launches, all orphan of suspended fairs and physical displays due to Corona virus.

Insectology: Food for Buzz - Photo by Atelier Boelhouwer.

Insectology: Food for Buzz – Photo by Atelier Boelhouwer.

Channelling Change: Inside A Designer’s Brain takes a closer look at the specific Dutch design mentality through the work of 14 talented designers. The exhibition focuses on the topic of sustainability and “presents products, processes and projects that tackle the sustainability problem at its core,” say at Ventura Projects.

By emphasizing the benefits of sustainable solutions and by making companies and industries aware of what innovations are possible.” Say at Ventura Projects. Check the ones we liked the most!


A design collection inspired by humans’ minerals consumption

Channelling Change exhibition - Pictured: Future Remnants - Photo by Xandra van Der Eijk.

Pictured: Future Remnants – Photo by Xandra van Der Eijk.

Xandra van der Eijk‘s Future Remnants is a research into the influence of man on the evolutionary development of mineral formation. “Man is responsible for a large scale redistribution of matter, creating situations that lead to unintended and unexpected reactions,” says thew designer.

The series is made of widely available metals and solutions and it is based on scientific research on the surge in mineral diversity over the past fifty years. “The project demonstrates how credible the alteration of earth’s geology by mankind is while speculating on what will emerge from our actions in deep time.”


Artificial flowers helping pollinators to thrive

Insectology: Food for Buzz - Photo by Atelier Boelhouwer.

Insectology: Food for Buzz – Photo by Atelier Boelhouwer.

Atelier Boelhouwer‘s Insectology: Food for Buzz is a series of artificial ongoing flowering flowers to serve as an emergency food source for the ‘big 5 of pollination’: bees, bumblebees, hoverflies, butterflies and moths.

Together with engineers and scientists these 5 colourful, man-made flowers have been developed to be self-sustaining and continuously producing natural objects that form the ultimate attractions to those of the big 5. “By using all unused empty spaces these flowers aim to revive insect populations.”


3D-printing paper pulp instead of plastic

3D-printing paper pulp by Beer Holthuis.

3D-printing paper pulp by Beer Holthuis.

Beer Holthuis has devised a 3D printer using paper pulp that only takes a little of natural binder which makes the products endlessly recyclable and surprisingly strong. “There is a growing market for 3D printing on demand. Still, the print material is almost always plastic, besides some expensive exceptions,” explain the designer. “I was surprised there are no real sustainable materials used in 3D printing.


Future sponsored goods: from KLM milk to Maestro Elite nuts mix

'Sponsored by ©' by Pauline Wiersema & Thieu Custers - Photo by the deisgners.

‘Sponsored by ©’ by Pauline Wiersema & Thieu Custers – Photo by the deisgners.

The increase of prices for vegetables and fruits has continued steadily over the years. A healthy diet has become a luxury for most people. Pauline Wiersema & Thieu Custers envisioned a future where big companies will brand supermarkets primary products to keep prices low. Are you ready for KLM Milk, Dela bread, Maestro Elite nuts mix, Tata Steel spinach or Shell oil?

In return, companies can put their advertising in and on the products. For those that have some more money to spend, a Premium version is available without any of the advertisement from sponsoring companies. “One luxury replaces the other…


Water harvesting urban panel

Aquatecture by Shaakira Jassat of Studio Sway - Photo by Angeline Swinkels.

Aquatecture by Shaakira Jassat of Studio Sway – Photo by Angeline Swinkels.

Aquatecture by Studio Sway is a modular panel designed to harvest water in urban areas where space is at a premium. When integrated with technology, it can harvest moisture from the air. The studded, funnel like perforations on the surface were specifically designed to allow falling rainwater in, as it flows over the panel.

The harvested water is transported to a collection tank and could be pumped back into a building’s grey water system or stored for later use. “The goal was to create a water harvester that would fit in urban spaces through compactness, visual identity and ability to integrate into architecture.”


Loving sustainable objects

Oddities by Studio Yvon Smeets - Photo by Studio Yvon Smeets.

Oddities by Studio Yvon Smeets – Photo by Studio Yvon Smeets.

With the Oddities project Studio Yvon Smeets questions the relationship we have with objects of daily use. A series interior products in ceramics requiring a certain affection were designed to stimulate empathy. “By playing with recognizable figurative elements such as fur, clothing and limbs, the objects invoke emotional interest through our tendency to take care of what is dear to us.”


All photos: courtesy of Ventura Projects

3D-printing paper pulp by Beer Holthuis.

3D-printed designs paper pulp by Beer Holthuis.

'Sponsored by ©' by Pauline Wiersema & Thieu Custers - Photo by the deisgners.

‘Sponsored by ©’ by Pauline Wiersema & Thieu Custers – Photo by the deisgners.