Celebrating Women in Architecture - Above portrait of Lina Bo Bardi at the MASP building construction site - Courtesy of Instituto Bardi

Celebrating Women in Architecture – Above portrait of Lina Bo Bardi at the MASP building construction site – Courtesy of Instituto Bardi.

Architecture – Why do female architects still not receive the recognition their work deserves? Why have they especially hard hit by the pandemic? Why global reports show that they are averagely paid less than their male colleagues? Women in architecture have a tough job, and long is the way to equality. On International Women’s Day we have decided to select great news to celebrate female architects’ huge contribution in past, present and future architecture.


Lina Bo Bardi wins special ‘Golden Lion’ award at La Biennale di Venezia

Portrait of Lina Bo Bardi - Photo by Pietro Bardi, 1947, courtesy of Instituto Bardi

Portrait of Lina Bo Bardi – Photo by Pietro Bardi, 1947, courtesy of Instituto Bardi.

Venice Biennale has nominated the late modernist architect Lina Bo Bardi as the recipient of the Special Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement in memoriam. “Her career as a designer, editor, curator, and activist reminds us of the role of the architect as convener and importantly, as the builder of collective visions.” Said Hashim Sarkis, curator of Biennale Architettura 2021 which is scheduled to inaugurate on May 21. “Lina Bo Bardi also exemplifies the perseverance of the architect in difficult times whether wars, political strife, or immigration, and her ability to remain creative, generous, and optimistic throughout.” Read more…


‘Women in Architecture’ new publication by Hatje Cantz

Women in Architecture - Past, Present, and Future' cover - Photo by Hatje Cantz

Women in Architecture – Past, Present, and Future’ cover – Photo by Hatje Cantz.

Plautilla Bricci (1616–1705), the first professional female architect recorded in Rome, pioneer of modernist architecture Eileen Gray (1878-1976) and Zaha Hadid (1950-2016), the first woman to win a Pritzker Architecture Prize, are among the protagonists of the new book Women in architecture by German publisher Hatje Cantz. The book features the voices of thirty-six internationally active women architects narrating their own projects.

This diverse panorama spanning continents and building typologies is supplemented by essays on pioneering female architects, and analyses that get to the bottom of the structural discrimination against women architects. Find out more…


Kate Macintosh wins the Jane Drew Prize 2021

Portrait of Kate Macintosh - Photo by Ivan Jones

Portrait of Kate Macintosh – Photo by Ivan Jones.

Kate Macintosh is the winner of the Jane Drew Prize 2021. The prize is named after the late English Modernist architect Jane Drew, a renowned advocate for women in a male-dominated profession and is part of the W Awards, run by the AJ and the Architectural Review, which are being held during the week of 8 March.
Born in Rotherham and then moved to the UK,  Kate Macintosh is best known for her 1960s council housing projects, the first of which she designed when she was 28 years old. Macintosh joins previous prizewinners Zaha Hadid, Amanda Levete, Elizabeth Diller and Denise Scott Brown among others.


Five “undervalued” women architects Part W is creating Wikipedia pages for

Screenshot from Wikipedia - Image via Dezeen

Screenshot from Wikipedia – Image via Dezeen.

Women’s architecture collective Part W is one of several organisations working to increase the number of female architects listed on Wikipedia. On Dezeen, Sarah Ackland has picked five significant women that she believes should have pages on the site.

The current and historic gender imbalance of those working in architecture is well documented and is reflected on Wikipedia, where many significant women architects do not have listings. “It’s important that Wikipedia include significant women,” says Ackland to Dezeen. Indeed, only 17 percent of all biographies on Wikipedia are about women and this makes it is harder for the general public to find information about female architects. Read more…


  • All photos: courtesy of Hatje Cantz Verlag.