LES FEMMES DE DELFT - Photo by Meisterwerke.
LES FEMMES DE DELFT – All photos by Meisterwerke.

Paris 2019 – Belgian brand Meisterwerke launches Les Femmes de Delftembroidered panels series taking Flemish tapestry to new heights with ironic anachronisms and an eye-catching confrontation between highbrow culture and elements of contemporary pop culture.

LES FEMMES DE DELFT - Photo by Meisterwerke.

The series depicts a young woman in a Vermeeresque landscape. Her back is tattooed with Delft motifs combining ancient and modern. Designer Isabelle Torrelle embarked on a partnership with the Dutch Royal Delft ceramics factory. She was given unique access to the archives for suitable Delft motifs that would serve as tattoos for the woman’s back. 

LES FEMMES DE DELFT - Photo by Meisterwerke.

With the help of modern technology we can work even more precisely and perfectly today.” Explains Isabelle Torrelle. “But don’t be mistaken: that doesn’t make the technique any less of an art craft.”

“There is still a human being controlling the machine, weaving and embroidering. By combining the two techniques, I have created images with a far greater fullness of form, detail and colour than found in ancient tapestries. That is the ‘modern’ difference.” 

LES FEMMES DE DELFT - Photo by Meisterwerke.

Medieval Flemish tapestries weren’t merely decorative, they also had a more practical insulating purpose. That’s why the new Meisterwerke panels can be used as both wall decorations and room screens when mounted on an elegant metal support.

Meisterwerke is a project by Isabelle Torrelle and Christian Otto, who love to share their passion for art and textiles. The creative minds behind the brand have a particularly rich journey through Flemish weaving.

THE HISTORIAN - Photo by Meisterwerke.
THE HISTORIAN – Photo by Meisterwerke.

Last year Isabelle Torrelle exhibited her work for the first time at the Maison et Objet trade fair. In The Historians she used ancient weaving and embroidery techniques to depict two unusual figures: a woman and a man, apparently dating from the late Middle Ages, but each with an arm covered in a 21 century ‘sleeve tattoo’.

THE HISTORIAN - Photo by Meisterwerke.
THE HISTORIAN – Photo by Meisterwerke.

All images by Meisterwerke.