TAKT Project for KISHU+ - Photo by Masayuki Hayashi

TAKT Project for KISHU+ – All photos by Masayuki Hayashi

Paris 2018 – At Maison Objet, TAKT Project presents the debut collection of KISHU+, a lacquerware design accessories brand from the Wakayama prefecture in Japan. The company incorporates modern technologies harnessing from the know-how of local producing areas such as Maki-e and Negoro-nuri in the name of “liberal craftsmanship”.


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TAKT Project for KISHU+ - Photo by Masayuki Hayashi

We have great respect of traditional craftsmanship but we are challenging to go forward with a more liberal approach by incorporating modern technology” explains name, co-founder of TAKT Project. “These things are not a replacement for hard craftsmanship, but a challenge for further extend it.” Explain at KISHU+.

TAKT Project for KISHU+ - Photo by Masayuki Hayashi

The SAKKAKU Maki-e box was designed by digital 3D technology being projected on a cuboid and painted by hand. When viewed from a certain angle, the maki-e becomes visible once more. Long story short: think digital, draw by hand. The Maki-e Japanese technique involves decorating with gold or silver powder on lacquered surfaces with a traditional brushes.

SAKKAKU by TAKT Project for KISHU+ - Photo by Masayuki Hayashi

The SHIZUKU pendant lamp applies Maki-e not simply to a decoration, but rather to a efficient reflected light. The HIGURE table lamp features hand painted maki-e with its subtle variations to transform the hard electric light to create a soft light inspired by sunsets’ hues.

HIGURE by TAKT Project for KISHU+ - Photo by Masayuki Hayashi

By utilizing the characteristics of hand painted maki-e, we have created a king of soft variation not usually found in home electronics.” Explain at TAKT Project. The debut collection feature also ORI glossy sheet-metal trays and MINAMO candle holder which creates an elegant ripple effect by using computers simulation and then painting with in-jet black lacquer.

MINAMO by TAKT Project for KISHU+ - Photo by Masayuki Hayashi

3D digital design meets craftsmanship. The SHIMA single-flower vases are both hand-worked and machine-worked coating Japanese lacquer on a aluminum extruded material. The uneven form of TOGI wooden box is carefully carved out using computer control. The lacquered surface is then polished by hand creating a three-dimensional effect.

SHIMA by TAKT Project for KISHU+ - Photo by Masayuki Hayashi

For the MICHIKAKE mirror “we lacquered on a glass surface for the first time. The lacquer plays a role in the frame as well. At the same time the differences in texture produce three attractive variations in reflection”.

MICHIKAKE by TAKT Project for KISHU+ - Photo by Masayuki Hayashi

For the KAKERA metal polyhedron boxes glossy lacquer is applied on each facet and then polished by the edges according to the Negoro-nuri technique to create a comfortable feeling. Negoro-nuri ancient technique requires black lacquer being coated multiple times before coating a final single vermillion lacquer on top.

KAKERA by TAKT Project for KISHU+ - Photo by Masayuki Hayashi

All photos by Masayuki Hayashi; courtesy of TAKT Project and KISHU+.

SHIZUKU by TAKT Project for KISHU+ - Photo by Masayuki Hayashi