The Italian Landscape @ Italian Pavilion, Venice Architecture Biennale - Foto by Marina Caneve

The Italian Landscape @ Italian Pavilion, Venice Architecture Biennale – Foto by Marina Caneve

In Italy, generations of architects layered their work incorporating previous states and styles through a continuous metamorphosis. This metamorphosis has rarely been a reinterpretation of existing projects but rather an architectural grafting. The INNESTI/GRAFTING exhibition at Italian Pavilion in Venice displays how the Italian architecture dealt with past with an unexpected botanical perspective. www.labiennale.orgwww-innesti-grafting.it – www.zucchiarchitetti.com

Archifunnel @ Italian Pavilion, Venice Architecture Biennale - Foto by Marina Canevi

Archifunnel @ Italian Pavilion, Venice Architecture Biennale – Photo by Marina Canevi

The exhibition curated by Cino Zucchi is dived in three main areas. The first one is focused on Milan 2015 EXPO and showcases the urban concept of the project, the Italian Pavilion, and local sustainable development and future projections of the area after the event. In this section YellowOffice project stands out for imagining a re-use of the Expo site as an pan-religious cemetery where people of all faiths, atheists and agnostics can truly rest in peace beyond any political issue or religious diatribe.

Luigi Moretti - Corso Italia, Milano. Courtesy of CZA Architetti

Luigi Moretti – Corso Italia, Milano. Courtesy of CZA Architetti

A section of the exhibition is dedicated to Milan as a laboratory of modernity. Here it is possible to discover how the city was grafted starting from the facade of the Duomo – that was designed, built and redone continuously for almost five centuries – until the latest skyscrapers that Rem Koolhas would probably tag as globalized architecture. A quite mesmerising video mapping on a Milan scale model enhances how the urban development caused a continuous layering of different styles since first Roman settlements.

Gio Ponti, Antonio Fornaroli, Montecatini Palace, Milan 1936-1938 - ©CZA

Gio Ponti, Antonio Fornaroli, Montecatini Palace, Milan 1936-1938 – © CZA

Maestro Gio Ponti once said that the Italian landscape is made “half by God and half by architects”. Indeed, the second room of the INNESTI/GRAFTING offers an overview on Italian contemporary landscape featuring the recent work of some of the most influent studios. Here, an animated mosaic by reknown Studio Azzurro features a selection of video-perspectives on contemporary Italian landscape submitted by those who answered to an open call in collaboration with influent blogzine Designboom.

Inhabited landscapes by Studio Azzuro @ Italian Pavilion, Venice Architecture Biennale - Photo by Marina Caneve.

Inhabited landscapes by Studio Azzuro @ Italian Pavilion, Venice Architecture Biennale – Photo by Marina Caneve.

The archifunnel, an expecially designed portal that represents a clear example of grafting, and the aerial bench installation in the garden on the back complete the exhibition at the Arsenale.

Photos: courtesy of Cino Zucchi studio – Videos: courtesy of La Biennale.

www.labiennale.org – www-innesti-grafting.it – www.zucchiarchitetti.com

Photo by Marina Caneve

Photo by Marina Caneve