Milan 2018 – Disco Gufram club-culture inspired furniture collection explodes the restless energy and joie de vivre of the radical of Italian Radical Design brand Gufram. The series features party sofas , after party side tables and candy-pop carpets  by Atelier Biagetti, ROTGANZEN and GGSV. 


• RELATED STORIES: Archipanic loves club-culture. Read more…

Disco Gufram. After Party by ROTGANTZEM - All photos by Leonardo Scotti, courtesy of Gufram.

Disco Gufram. After Party by ROTGANTZEM – All photos by Leonardo Scotti, courtesy of Gufram.

The club is a space so intertwined with our pop culture since the mid 1960’s. We re-thought and re-shaped it with contemporary objects which combine past and present.” Says to Archipanic Charley Vezza, owner, soul of Gufram and a master himself in the art of enjoying life. The collection is conceived for eclectic living rooms owned by people who organise parties for intimate dance-off moments.

Disco Gufram. ‘70s Linea Discoteca re-design by Atelier Biagetti - Photo by Leonardo Scotti, courtesy of Gufram.

‘70s Linea Discoteca re-design by Atelier Biagetti.

Every disco has to have a mesmerizing dance floor, so Gufram invited the Paris-based studio GGSV – Gaëlle Gabillet and Stéphane Villard to conceive a compilation of  carpets to do the trick.

Disco Gufram. Dance Floor by GGSV - Photo by Leonardo Scotti, courtesy of Gufram.

Disco Gufram. Dance Floor by GGSV.

Ooh, I feel love, I feel love, I feel love, I feel love, I feel love… “The Dance Floor rug is the encounter of a striped font and a podium under a neon light, so that you are the King of the divan”, says Gaëlle and Stéphane.

Disco Gufram. Dance Floor by GGSV - Photo by Leonardo Scotti, courtesy of Gufram.

Disco Gufram. Dance Floor by GGSV.

Atelier Biagetti’s seats reshaped the late ‘70s Linea Discoteca collection to create disco-inspired collection. After spending some few nights out at different clubs – a pleasant way to examine the subject, Laura Baldassarri and Alberto Biagetti restyled five different seats, which can easily come to rock and inhabit your house straight from the dance floor.

Disco Gufram. ‘70s Linea Discoteca re-design by Atelier Biagetti - Photo by Leonardo Scotti, courtesy of Gufram.

70s Linea Discoteca re-design by Atelier Biagetti.

The designers intended to stick to the original past collection but with a contemporary wind. “Each piece is conceived as a person with a precise attitude, a sense of humour, a beauty, also some vices and dreams that get wild during the night.” Explain Laura Baldassari and Alberto Biagetti.

Disco Gufram. ‘70s Linea Discoteca re-design by Atelier Biagetti - Photo by Leonardo Scotti, courtesy of Gufram.

70s Linea Discoteca re-design by Atelier Biagetti.

And when the party is over and it is time to go home, even the furniture let itself go a little. Dutch pop art design studio ROTGANZEN’s After Party series comprises three cabinets and two coffee-tables representing a melancholic reminder to the temporary nature of glamour. The blown traditional and iconic disco ball has been modified as it would finally rest and recover after spending a long night out.

Disco Gufram. After Party by ROTGANTZEM - Photo by Leonardo Scotti, courtesy of Gufram.

After Party by ROTGANTZEM.

The After party series is a “visual metaphor of fading glory as we can see in the frozen blobs of amorphous shapes, covered by a carefully arranged glittering skin, composed of fragmented mirror. What once was a perfect shape takes on new character and meaning. However, rather than a doomed take on reality, the intention is to offer a playful image of past glory”.

Disco Gufram. After Party by ROTGANTZEM - Photo by Leonardo Scotti, courtesy of Gufram.

After Party by ROTGANTZEM.

All photos: courtesy of Gufram.

Disco Gufram. ‘70s Linea Discoteca re-design by Atelier Biagetti - Photo by Leonardo Scotti, courtesy of Gufram.

70s Linea Discoteca re-design by Atelier Biagetti.

Disco Gufram. ‘70s Linea Discoteca re-design by Atelier Biagetti - Photo by Leonardo Scotti, courtesy of Gufram.

70s Linea Discoteca re-design by Atelier Biagetti.