Cement mier disco-ball by Benedetto Bufalino - Photo: courtesy of Benedetto Bufalino.

Cement mier disco-ball – All Photos: courtesy of Benedetto Bufalino.

Benedetto Bufalino turned a cement mixer into a jamming disco ball. On the occasion of the Fête des Lumières, Lyon festival of lights, a lonely construction site vehicle parked near scaffoldings glimmered and gleamed a radiant spectrum turning the street into a dance floor. The installation contributed to bring back a festive and friendly energy in the French city after the 2015 edition of the festival was cancelled due to security reasons in the wake of Paris attack.


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The project was designed to bring together both tourists, residents and neighbours” said French designer and artist Benedetto Bufalino who has a knack for bringing the ordinary into something extraordinary. The cement mixer is envisioned as an offbeat and innovative method for providing illumination as well” added Bufalino who teamed with lighting designer Benoit Deseille.

Cement mier disco-ball by Benedetto Bufalino - Photo: courtesy of Benedetto Bufalino.

Bufalino is known for his unconventional approach to urban interventions, frequently installing active aquariums into phone booths and creating a variety of public art pieces including cars turned into a ping pong table and installing a walled football field on a beach in France.

Cement mier disco-ball by Benedetto Bufalino - Photo: courtesy of Benedetto Bufalino.

Fête des Lumières is one the most stunning lighting design events worldwide. In the wake of 2015 Paris terroristic attacks the festival was cancelled. This year, the event took place again with major police presence and it all went smoothly.


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Cement mier disco-ball by Benedetto Bufalino - Photo: courtesy of Benedetto Bufalino.

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The 2016 edition brightened up with dazzling displays including also video mapping and video games inspired interactive optical illusions across Lyon’s different districts. The event’s festive attitude responded to a growing “fear propaganda” across France and Europe.

Lyon’s light celebrations began as a religious tradition in 1852, when citizens used to lit candles in their windows to mark the inauguration of a Virgin Mary statue at the city’s hilltop Basilica. Over the years, the light show gained an extraordinary hi-tech dazzle. Every year, designers from every corner of the planet gather to create temporary nightclubs, video backdrops and magnificent multimedia shows. From candlelight tradition to construction site dance-floor 

Cement mier disco-ball by Benedetto Bufalino - Photo: courtesy of Benedetto Bufalino.