Belgian Crew! - The Great Deal of Pain(t) by El Nino76. Photo by ArchiPanic.

Belgian Crew! – The Great Deal of Pain(t) by El Nino76. All photos by ArchiPanic.

ArtBelgian Crew! street art installation “occupies” the sumptuous architecture of Egmont Palace in Brussels. The project is promoted by the Belgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs that resides in a XVI century mansion in Sablon district overlooking the city from the top of a hill – Watch the video.


RELATED STORIES: Graffiti, dance, graphic design and even a bit of magic. Read more about art related projects on ArchiPanic…

Belgian Crew! - Axel installation. Photo by ArchiPanic

Axel’s installation.

Visitors can imagine the street artists secretly entering the ministerial building and occupying is spaces, each in their own way…” Says Pierre-Olivier Rollin, present director of the BPS22 art museum and curator of the Belgian Crew! exhibition.

Belgian Crew! - Hyperfuse by Frédéric Platéus. Photo by ArchiPanic.

Hyperfuse by Frédéric Platéus.

Axel has been « tagging » an official ministerial vehicle. The jeep is covered in multicolour paint contrasting with the ‘silent’ monochromatic architecture of Egmont Palace street-facing courtyard. The artist aimed to capture the “aesthetics of the urgency” that characterised the first street interventions.

Belgian Crew! - Axel installation. Photo by ArchiPanic

Axel’s installation.

A splash of yellow paint drips down the Versailles-inspired marble stairs. The Great Deal of Pain(t) installation by El Nino76 refers to the history of the place.  Back to the 1970’s, during the ratification of the creation of the EU, four political personalities were the target of a splash of blue painting which reached the steps of the staircase.

Belgian Crew! - The Great Deal of Pain(t) by El Nino76. Photo by ArchiPanic.

The Great Deal of Pain(t) by El Nino76.

Walking to the upper floor, Reset’81 designed ghostly ‘fugitive’ graffiti on the side walls of the stairs. On the upper floor the duo Colonel & Spit revisits traditional ceramics by adding decorative patterns inspired by graffiti. 

Belgian Crew! - Ceramics by Colonel & Spit. Photo by ArchiPanic.

Ceramics by Colonel & Spit.

Frédéric Platéus transformed his letterings in sculpture. The Bomb Air seems to be floating and represents a flop (inflated letters) of REC, the initial tag of the artist. Hyperfuse is a 3D-modelling of his tag with a more angled design with sharp diagonals crushing the characters into compact letters.

Belgian Crew! - Bomb Air by Frédéric Platéus. Photo by ArchiPanic.

Bomb Air by Frédéric Platéus.

In a side courtyard from the main square,  Sara Conti created an imaginary scene inspired by visions of paradise. The pasted paper street-art technique allows to  reconstruct a dreamlike vegetal universe contrasting with the surrounding architecture.

Belgian Crew! - Croce e Delizia by Sara Conti. Photo by ArchiPanic.

Croce e Delizia by Sara Conti.

All the artists decorated also the mirrors in the ballroom in the upper floor. The exhibition is open to the public until august 31st – All photos by ArchiPanic.

Belgian Crew! - Bomb Air by Frédéric Platéus. Photo by ArchiPanic.

Bomb Air by Frédéric Platéus.