2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's LUCERNE FESTIVAL ARK NOVA -  Photo courtesy of Iwan Baan.
2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki’s Ark Nova @ Luzern Festival – Photo by Iwan Baan.

ArchitectureArata Isozaki, 87, wins 2019 Pritzker Architecture Prize. Across his 50 years long carrier, the Japanese architect – the first one to build outside of Japan – created inflatable mobile concert halls, Olympic stadiums merging Catalan vaults with Buddist temples and Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art. “What is patently clear is that he has not been following trends but forging his own path,” read the citation issued by the Pritzker jury.

2019 Pritzker Prize - Arata Isozaki's portrait.
2019 Pritzker Prize – Arata Isozaki’s portrait.

Arata Isozaki was born in Ōita – Island of Kyushu, Japan – in 1931. “I grew up on ground zero. My first experience of architecture was the void of architecture,” explained once the architect referring to the profound impact on him as a child after the Hiroshima nuclear disaster in 1945. It’s then when “I began to consider how people might build their homes and cities”.

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's Tsukaba Center Building - Photo courtesy of Yasuhiro Ishimoto.
Tsukaba Center Building – Photo courtesy of Yasuhiro Ishimoto.

Isozaki’s early successes in architecture transpired during the era following the Allied occupation of Japan, when the country sought to rebuild itself after the ruins of the Second World War. The Ōita Prefectural Library (1966) in Japan was inspired by both European Brutalism and the Japanese postwar metabolism movement.

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's Ōita Prefectural Library - Photo courtesy of Yasuhiro Ishimoto.
Ōita Prefectural Library – Photo courtesy of Yasuhiro Ishimoto.

Most recently, in the wake of the 2011 tsunami that devastated his country, he teamed up with Anish Kapoor to create an inflatable mobile concert hall that could visit the affected areas. Made from a stretchy plastic membrane, the venue could be quickly inflated or disassembled. “We named the Project Ark Nova, or ‘new ark’, with the hope that it will become a symbol of recovery immediately after the great earthquake disaster,” said the designers.

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's LUCERNE FESTIVAL ARK NOVA -  Photo courtesy of Iwan Baan.
Arata Isozaki’s Ark Nova @ Luzern Festival – Photo by Iwan Baan.

The cross cultural imprint of Isozaki’s oeuvre was forged by explorative journeys across the globe. “I wanted to see the world through my own eyes, so I traveled around the globe at least ten times before I turned thirty.” recalls the Laureate.

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's MoLA - Photo courtesy of Hisao Suzuki.
Arata Isozaki’s MoLA – Photo by Hisao Suzuki.

I wanted to feel the life of people in different places and visited extensively inside Japan, but also to the Islamic world, villages in the deep mountains of China, South East Asia, and metropolitan cities in the U.S. I was trying to find any opportunities to do so, and through this, I kept questioning, ‘what is architecture?’,” recalls the Laureate.

2019 Pritzker Prize - Arata Isozaki's Art Tower Mito - Photo: courtesy of Yasuhiro Ishimoto.
Arata Isozaki’s Art Tower Mito – Photo: courtesy of Yasuhiro Ishimoto.

His buildings appear geometrically simple, but are infused with theory and purpose. The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1981-1986 Los Angeles, United States) was the architect’s first international commission.

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's MoLA - Photo courtesy of Hisao Suzuki.
Arata Isozaki’s MoLA – Photo courtesy of Hisao Suzuki.

Though controversial and geographically challenging, the red Indian sandstone building was resolved by Isozaki’s eloquent awareness of scale through an assemblage of volumes, while employing the golden ratio and yin yang theory throughout, evoking the complementary nature of western and eastern relationships.

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's Allianz Tower in Milan - Photo by Alessandra Chemollo.
Arata Isozaki’s Allianz Tower in Milan – Photo by Alessandra Chemollo.

His works balance global universality and local identity. The Ceramic Park Mino (1996-2002 Gifu, Japan), a ceramics museum situated in a cascading valley, preserves surrounding vegetation while serving as an extension of the topography through outdoor terraces, observation decks and overlooks, detailed with regional stoneware bricks and ceramic.

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's Ceramic Park Mino - Photo: courtesy of Hisao Suzuki.
Arata Isozaki’s Ceramic Park Mino – Photo: courtesy of Hisao Suzuki.

Designed for the 1992 Summer Olympic Games, Palau Sant Jordi (1983-1990 Barcelona, Spain) is positioned partially below ground to minimize the profile of the 17,000-person facility and instead highlight the surrounding Montjuïc hillside. The domed roof was built referencing Catalan vault techniques, while the sloped forms were inspired by those of Buddhist temples.

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's MOMA Gunma - Photo: courtesy of Yasuhiro Ishimoto.
Arata Isozaki’s MOMA Gunma – Photo: courtesy of Yasuhiro Ishimoto.

The Museum of Modern Art Gunma (1974, Japan) was conceived as an arrangement of cubes, combined to form a large rectangular block with projecting wings. The Nara Centennial Hall (1992-1998, Japan) is distinguished by its giant curving profile and facade of zinc and grey ceramic tiles, which make reference to the roofs of the city’s Todaiji Temple.

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's Nara Centennial Hall - Photo: courtesy of Hisao Suzuki-
Arata Isozaki’s Nara Centennial Hall – Photo: courtesy of Hisao Suzuki-

The Domus Museum in CITY (1995, Spain) was developed with César Portela and features has large granite walls and a single curved facade composed of 6,600 slate tiles, which enclose a series of exhibition spaces positioned over platforms connected by ramps.

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's Qatar National Convention Center - Photo: courtesy of Hisao Suzuki.
Arata Isozaki’s Qatar National Convention Center – Photo: courtesy of Hisao Suzuki.

Among the most recent completed projects also the Allianz Tower in Milan (2003-2014, Italy) which harnesses from the forward-thinking attitude of Italy’s business capital, the Qatar National Convention Center in Doha (2004-2011, Qatar), and the saddle-shaped Shanghai Symphony Hall (2008-2014, China), cladded in terracotta bricks.

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's Shanghai Symphony Hall - Photo: courtesy of Chen Hao.
Arata Isozaki’s Shanghai Symphony Hall – Photo: courtesy of Chen Hao.

Isozaki is the 46th recipient of the illustrious Pritzker Prize, and the eighth Japanese architect to have received the honour. “Isozaki was one of the first Japanese architects to build outside of Japan during a time when western civilizations traditionally influenced the East, making his architecture—which was distinctively influenced by his global citizenry—truly international,” comments Tom Pritzker, Chairman of Hyatt Foundation. “In a global world, architecture needs that communication.”

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's Art Tower Mito - Photo: courtesy of Yasuhiro Ishimoto.
Arata Isozaki’s Art Tower Mito – Photo: courtesy of Yasuhiro Ishimoto.

All photos: courtesy of Pritzker Architecture Prize.

2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's Palau Sant Jordi - Photo: courtesy of Hisao Suzuki.
Arata Isozaki’s Palau Sant Jordi – Photo: courtesy of Hisao Suzuki.
2019 Pritzker Prize. Arata Isozaki's Kitakyushu Central Library - Photo: courtesy of FUJITSUKA Mitsumasa.
Arata Isozaki’s Kitakyushu Central Library – Photo: courtesy of FUJITSUKA Mitsumasa.